Wednesday, February 19, 2014

Internet anti-Semitism a ‘mortal danger,’ says Knesset Immigration, Absorption and Diaspora Committee chairman MK Yoel Razbozov

Razbozov called for countries to enact legislation restricting online hate, and warned that if Jews will not act to combat the spread of anti-Semitism online, they will eventually “find themselves in mortal danger.” Representatives of the Foreign Ministry, the Ministry of Jerusalem and Diaspora Affairs, the Israeli Internet Association and the Anti-Defamation League, among other bodies, testified regarding the dangers of online hate and discussed methods of combating disinformation about Jews and Israel.
The World Zionist Organization established a communications center for combating hate online and is beginning two pilot courses for training Israelis to engage in this struggle, WZO Department for Countering Anti-Semitism chief Yaakov Hagoel told lawmakers. The World Zionist Organization established a communications center for combating hate online and is beginning two pilot courses for training Israelis to engage in this struggle, WZO Department for Countering Anti-Semitism chief Yaakov Hagoel told lawmakers.        ***Read article at The Jerusalem Post***
*More information here 

2 comments:

Michzel said...

Here's a marketing idea. Design a super hero-type T-shirt for kids of all ages with an emblem; "Anti-Kike."

"No where to run; no where to hide--beware! (scream, tremble, bite your nails) It's the Ant-Kike!"

Michzel said...

Yes, this explanatory comment is over due. My original post may appear offensive to some; to those, I apologize.

Notwithstanding, I have a story to tell and an explanation for revisiting the "Kike" label.

About 15 years ago having become disabled beyond being employable, I would spend much of my day at an outdoor coffee bar talking to whoever was inclined to do so. Over time I got to know a tall slender elderly homeless lady who'd obviously been a model in her youth. Few wanted to talk to her because she was obviously destitute and repellingly bitter. One day she confided in me that her life had been ruined "by those damn kikes." I learned that day that past generations used a more precise vocabulary to define what they saw.

Wikipedia uses Leo Rostin's entomology of the word kike:

"The word kike was born on Ellis Island when there were Jewish immigrants who were also illiterate (or could not use Latin alphabet letters), when asked to sign the entry-forms with the customary 'X,' refused, because they associated an X with the cross of Christianity, and made a circle in its place. The Yiddish word for 'circle' is kikel (pronounced KY-kul), and for 'little circle,' kikeleh (pronounced KY-kul-uh). Before long the immigration inspectors were calling anyone who signed with an 'O' in place of an 'X' a kikel or kikeleh or kikee or, finally and succinctly, kike."

Those familiar with the symbolic serpent of Judaism encircling the earth--as elucidated by Victor Marsden's translation of the Protocols of Zion--should perceive that the kikel (O), defines Corrupt Judaism more precisely and succinctly than any other word one can think of.

Also interesting is the Kike's refusal to place a kikel in the word "God."

I am not anti-Semitic or anti-Jew per say. However, I am an outspoken anti-Kike.